NE Japan Earthquake Day 96: Refugee Count in Kyushu Climbing Because Fukushima Residents Cannot Return Home; Tokyo Power Unable to Contact Ten People Who Worked at Fukushima Reactor Immediately After Disaster

Refugee Count in Kyushu Climbing Because Fukushima Residents Cannot Return Home
Yomiuri Shimbun: 九州への避難なお急増…福島へ帰るに帰れない
June 14, 2011

More than three months after the Great Tōhoku Earthquake, over 2000 refugees from the Tōhoku and Kantō regions are living in the country’s westernmost areas: Kyushu, Yamaguchi, and Okinawa.

According to surveys conducted by each prefecture from June 2-13, the current refugee count in the far west is 2,090; the prefectures’ individual counts are 1.2-4.7 times higher than they were a month after the disaster. The major reason is that the Fukushima nuclear disaster has not been resolved, so refugees from that area are increasing. They intended to spend a limited time in the west, but many people cannot return even if they would like to.

The prefectures with the largest increases in refugees are Nagasaki (4.7 times higher in June than in April), Yamaguchi (4.1), Saga (2.6), and Fukuoka (1.8). Nagasaki counted 38 refugees April 22 and 178 on June 9; Yamaguchi counted 44 on April 7 and 179 on June 9. [The earthquake, tsunami, and meltdown occurred on March 11.)

Each prefecture has a large number of refugees from the Fukushima Reactor area.

Tokyo Power Unable to Contact Ten People Who Worked at Fukushima Reactor Immediately After Disaster
Yomiuri Shimbun: 原発作業員10人と連絡取れず…東電発表
June 14, 2011

On June 14, Tokyo Electric Power Company announced that so far, it has been unable to contact ten people who were members of the allied workforce at Fukushima I Reactor immediately after the earthquake and tsunami caused a meltdown there.

The Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare has ordered Tokyo Power to evaluate the amount of radiation suffered by the 3726 people who worked at the reactor in March. On the 13th, the Ministry ordered the company to finish the survey by the 20th.

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