NE Japan Earthquake Day 37: Japanologist Donald King (88, USA) Takes Japanese Citizenship and Will Become Permanent Resident; Last Week’s Magnitude 7 Quake’s Unexpected Cause: The Idozawa Fault in Fukushima

Japanologist Donald King (88, USA) Takes Japanese Citizenship and Will Become Permanent Resident

Yomiuri Shimbun: ドナルド・キーン氏が日本国籍取得、永住へ

Ryōji Yanagisawa reporting from New York, April 16, 2011

The revered Columbia University professor Dr. Donald King (age 88, United States), the most famous researcher of Japanese culture, decided after the Great Tōhoku Earthquake to take Japanese citizenship and establish permanent residence in Japan.

A person connected to him made the announcement on the 15th. Dr. King is doing this to show solidarity with victims of the quake.

According to the source, Dr. King’s explanation was “Nihon ga daisuki da kara” (“I really like Japan.”) He befriended [famous writer] Yukio Mishima while researching [revered 17th century dramatist] Monzaemon Chikamatsu, and in 2008 he was awarded an Order of Culture by the Emperor. He will give his final lecture at Columbia on the 26th.

Last Week’s Magnitude 7 Quake’s Unexpected Cause: The Idozawa Fault in Fukushima

Yomiuri Shimbun: 先日のM7余震、予想外の井戸沢断層が原因

April 16, 2011

Eastern Japan's Significant Faults

Eastern Japan’s Significant Faults. The Idozawa Fault, source of April 11th’s magnitude 7 quake, is near Iwaki City in Fukushima Prefecture. Source: The National Institute for Earthquake Research Advancement.

The magnitude 7.0 aftershock in eastern Fukushima on the 11th had an unexpected source: the Idozawa Fault.

The magnitude 9.0 earthquake shifted the balance of forces along the country’s continental faults, as well, making quakes more common and increasing the need for warnings along previously dormant faults, as well, according to researchers.

The Idozawa Fault is 19 kilometers long. The National Institute for Earthquake Research Advancement has prepared a long-term report with models and probabilities of magnitude 7+ earthquakes along faults over 20 kilometers long, but Idozawa was not included in it.

However, according to Yamagata University Professor Kōji Yagi’s investigation of the area on the 11th, the western side of the fault sunk 0.8-1.5 meters, and even the side facing the sea moved up to 30 centimeters. The break on the fault was at least 7 kilometers long.

There is a higher probability of action on continental faults before and after megathrust quakes like the Great Tōhoku Earthquake. About two months after the 1896 Meiji Sanriku Earthquake, the magnitude 7.2 Rikū Earthquake occurred in eastern Akita.

Original/原稿:

ドナルド・キーン氏が日本国籍取得、永住へ

 【ニューヨーク=柳沢亨之】日本文学研究の第一人者で米コロンビア大名誉教授のドナルド・キーン氏(88)が東日本大震災を受け、日本国籍を取得し、日本に永住する意思を固めた。

 同氏の関係者が15日、明らかにした。震災被災者と日本への連帯を示すためとみられる。

 関係者によると、キーン氏は「日本が大好きだから」と説明しているという。同氏は近松門左衛門の研究や三島由紀夫との交流などで知られ、2008年度に文化勲章を受章。26日には同大の最終講義を行う。

(2011年4月16日01時35分 読売新聞)

先日のM7余震、予想外の井戸沢断層が原因

 11日に福島県東部で起きた、東日本大震災の余震とみられるマグニチュード(M)7・0の地震は、大きな地震の発生が予想されていなかった「井戸沢断層」が動いて起きていたことが分かった。

 M9・0の東日本大震災の影響で、内陸部の活断層でも力のかかり具合が変化して地震が起きやすくなっていると見られ、動く確率が低いとされてきた活断層にも警戒が必要だと、専門家は指摘している。

 井戸沢断層は長さ19キロ程度。国の地震調査研究推進本部は、地表でのずれの長さが20キロ以上の活断層は、M7相当の地震が起きうるとして、規模や発生確率を予測する長期評価を発表しているが、井戸沢断層は対象外だった。

 しかし、山形大学の八木浩司教授(地形学)らが11日の地震を現地で調査したところ、震源付近の井戸沢断層沿いで、地盤の西側が0・8~1・5メートル沈下し、水平方向にも最大約30センチずれていた。断層のずれは少なくとも約7キロにわたるとみられる。

 東日本大震災のように、海と陸のプレート(岩板)境界で起こる海溝型地震の前後には、内陸部の活断層でも地震が活発化する傾向がある。1896年の明治三陸地震でも、約2か月後に秋田県東部で陸羽地震(M7・2)が起きている。

(2011年4月16日15時52分 読売新聞)

Explore posts in the same categories: Japan, Literature, Science, Math, Technology, Translations

Tags: , , , , ,

You can comment below, or link to this permanent URL from your own site.

One Comment on “NE Japan Earthquake Day 37: Japanologist Donald King (88, USA) Takes Japanese Citizenship and Will Become Permanent Resident; Last Week’s Magnitude 7 Quake’s Unexpected Cause: The Idozawa Fault in Fukushima”

  1. james smyth Says:

    “the western side of the fault sunk 0.8-1.5 meters”

    meters or centimeters? If meters, that’s alot!


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: