Seven Stories on the Seventeenth

RIP Bob Feller

The tape recorder was off and my notebook was put away and so I cannot write here what he said word for word. But I remember the important part. He told me that I was lucky, that what you need to succeed in this world is a father who believes in you. And he told me that his father believed in him. Funny thing, though, he said Bill Feller never once said, “Bob, someday you’re going to pitch in the big leagues.” No, there were no words. There are some things that cannot be said with words. There was only those sweaty Iowa afternoons and those chilly Iowa evenings, and the sun setting, and a baseball going back and forth. Everything he needed to know about life was in that back-and-forth.

Bill Feller died in 1943, while his son Bob was at war. He had seen his son become the best pitcher in baseball.

Christian Landmark Tree Cut Down in U.K.

Legend has it that the rare thorn tree on a hill in southern England had ties to the earliest days of Christianity, and pilgrims often left offerings at its base. In more recent times, local children honored its current incarnation each year by cutting sprigs to place on Queen Elizabeth II’s Christmas dining table.

Now British police want to know who sawed the limbs off the Glastonbury Holy Thorn Tree, reducing it to a stump. And they want to know why.

The People Who Mattered in 2010: Grýla – Responsible For The Year’s Biggest Volcanic Eruption

No one had as much effect on air travel in 2010 as the horrifying Icelandic mountain ogress Grýla, who this spring launched a plume of ash 30,000 feet into the sky from the Eyjafjallajökull volcano, shutting down airports across Europe and costing the global economy hundreds of millions of dollars.

2,400-year-old soup found in NW China

The institute said its archaeologists discovered the bronze vessel on Nov 25 when cleaning a Warring States Period (475-221 BC) tomb for the Xi’an Xianyang International Airport’s second construction phase.

“It’s the first time Chinese archaeologists have unearthed such a container with bone soup still inside,” archaeologist and head of the tomb’s excavation team Liu Daiyun said.

The streak that changed football

When the Baltimore Colts’ Johnny Unitas started his record 47-game streak of throwing at least one touchdown pass in a game in 1956, he was an obscure quarterback playing what was barely above a niche sport.

By time the streak ended four years later, and 50 years ago Saturday, Unitas was one of the most famous personalities in the country, pro football had grown to two leagues and was sprinting past college football and even baseball in national interest.

Another TSA Outrage

We [soldiers returning from Afghanistan] were ALL carrying weapons…actual assault rifles, and some of us were also carrying pistols…a guy empties his pockets and has a pair of nail clippers. Nail clippers. TSA informs the Soldier that they’re going to confiscate his nail clippers.

Kobe still tough, with assists from the greats

Out of nowhere one afternoon, Michael Jackson made a call to the irrepressible and isolated Kobe Bryant(notes), and so much changed for him. From a distance, the King of Pop could sense so much of his own obsessive genius within the prodigy. Bryant was the 18-year-old wonder for the Los Angeles Lakers, and no one knew what to make of a restlessness borne of a desperate desire for greatness.

“He noticed I was getting a lot of [expletive] for being different,” Bryant said.

They would talk for hours and hours, visiting at Neverland Ranch, and Bryant has long been fortified by the lessons Jackson instilled about the burden of honoring true talent, about the ways to open your mind to be smarter, sharper and insatiable in the chase.

“It sounds weird, I guess, but it’s true: I was really mentored by the preparation of Michael Jackson,” Bryant told Yahoo! Sports.

Explore posts in the same categories: China, Politics, Religion, Sports, USA

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